If you are like me then your Facebook feed and perhaps Facebook messenger (if you use it) has been jammed with messages from people like this one.

In short, these folks have not been hacked. They are the victim of the modern day version of the chain letter. The objective seems to be to get everyone all worked up that they have been hacked and generate a bunch of traffic on your social media feeds.

If someone does guess your password and can get into your account. That’s a pretty serious thing and you should log in and change your password as soon as possible.

One precaution would be to search for your name on facebook and make sure that someone did not open another account with your name and picture. If you do find one then you can report it to Facebook by going to the profile page for that account and clicking the three dots (ellipsis) and choose “Give feedback or report this profile.”

Better yet (and this is for all of you to consider) turn on two-factor authentication in Facebook (and other places you log in to regularly) and you will reduce your chances of someone getting into your account to almost zero.

Two-factor authentication means that when you go to login to a site you are asked to provide a numeric code that is either generated by another device (Facebook) or is sent to your other devices via a text message (Apple and Facebook)

To enable this in your Facebook account, go into your account settings and click on the Security and login section.

Scroll down and turn Use two-factor authentication on.

Now when you go to login to Facebook on a computer or device that has not been logged in from before you will get the following message.

The code generator is in the Facebook app on your phone. You can also click the Need another way to authenticate and ask for a text message to be sent to your phone.

Once you enter the code you will have the option of remembering that browser.

You will also be sent a message from Facebook telling you that someone logged into your account. That’s ok it was you! It’s always nice to get the notification just in case.

While this adds a step to your logging into these accounts, you can take comfort in the knowledge that your account is very hard to hack into and you can happily ignore all these chain emails and move on with your life.

 

John Mansel-Pleydell on Email
John Mansel-Pleydell
Instructional Services Supervisor @ Northern Buckeye
Google Certified Trainer