Category: Chrome

Curating Content Part 1 – Bookmarks

First a word about curation and why it’s so important. All teachers should have a good understanding of curation of content such as lesson plans, emails, videos, pictures, music and our documents and files. We are exposed to so much media in the average day and unless we apply some organization to it, many valuable resources are lost and forgotten. This series of tech tips articles will look at how we can become better content curators.

Bookmarks, Favorites call them what you will, we all use them every day to try and make finding things easier in the future. Hiding at the top of your browser window is the browser bookmarks bar which can be used and transformed into a digital bookmark curation center. read more

Where did my View Image button go?!?

You might have noticed that Google Image Search has lost its “View Image” button. Before this change, you could search for an image and click the “View Image” button to download it directly without leaving Google or visiting the website. Now, that button has been removed.

Google Image Search

Now, the View Image button has been removed.

The change comes in response to a legal settlement between Google and Getty Images. Almost two years ago, Getty Images sued Google in Europe, saying that the company’s image scraping techniques to display image search results were illegal. Earlier this week, Google and Getty Images announced a partnership and Getty withdrew its charges against Google. It appears that the removal of direct image links was part of the agreement. read more

Saving Bookmarks to the Bookmarks Bar

The term “bookmark this page” is a Chrome browser feature that allows you to create a shortcut link to a favorite website or one that you frequent often. When you click on the saved link, you will be directed to the site without having to enter the web address. What a timesaver!

The area directly below Chrome’s Omnibox (surrounded by red outline) is known as the Bookmark Bar. If you don’t see the Bookmark Bar, hit Control-Shift-B (Command-Shift-B on a Mac) to make it visible. 

Bookmarks Bar

You can save bookmarks to the bar. I don’t know about you, but if I don’t see the bookmark, there’s a good chance I’ll forget about it. To return to a site, you can just click on the bookmark link and instantly be directed to that site. read more

Put A Pin In It: Pin / Unpin Chrome Browser Tabs

Have you ever accidentally closed a Chrome browser tab? You know, the tab that contains precious research information or maybe Slides you are presenting to a class. Eeek!!

Fortunately, Chrome browser has a pinning feature that removes the X or close button on a tab. A pinned tab will be smaller and it will be relocated to the left of other tabs that are not pinned. Even when Chrome is closed and reopened, the pinned tab will remain.

To pin a tab:

  • Click on the tab using your shortcut menu (Windows: Right-Click | Macs: Control/Click
  • From the menu, select PIN TAB
  • Tab will become smaller and will no longer contain the X or close button. The tab will be moved to the far left

When you no longer need quick access to a Chrome tab, you can easily unpin the tab. read more

Quickly Add Events to Google Calendar Using the Chrome Address Bar

Do you use both Google Chrome and Calendar?  Need to quickly add a meeting to your calendar? Don’t open a new tab and enter it manually… just add it right from Chrome’s address bar!


This trick will take a few simple steps of setup, but once you’re done, you can type an event in natural language right in the address bar—such as “Faculty Meeting on Thursday at 3 pm”—and a new event will be created. We will use Chrome’s ability to have special search engines to set this functionality up.

First, right-click on the address bar and select “Edit search engines”.


Once you get to the Search engines dialog box, under Other search engines, enter a name, such as “Add Event”, in the first box. In the middle box, enter a keyword, such as “cal”, to type into the address bar to activate this custom search engine. 


Next, copy the following URL and paste it into the last box (it should be all on one line).

http://www.google.com/calendar/event?ctext=+%s+&action=TEMPLATE&pprop=HowCreated%3AQUICKADD


Press Enter when you’re done.

Now, the custom search engine will appear under Other search engines. Click “Done” to close the Search engines dialog box.


Important: Before using this custom search engine to add events to your calendar, you need to make sure you’re signed into the Chrome profile that matches the Google account to which you want to add events. If you need help doing this, watch this video.
Once you’re signed in to Chrome, type cal (or the keyword you assigned to it) in the address bar and press Tab or the Spacebar. You’ll see that “Search” and the name of the new search engine you created shows on the left side of the address bar. Using natural language, type the event you want to add to your calendar, like the screenshot below, and press Enter.


The Google Calendar new event screen with the relevant data filled in, such as the event title and the date and time. Add or change any other information for the event, such as the location, and click “Save”.
read more

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